iPhones Worth $13,000 Stolen From Apple Store by Teens

iPhones Worth $13,000 Stolen From Apple Store by Teens

It’s no secret that Apple is one of the most valuable companies in the world today, especially for this gang of robbers who decided to steal a bunch of iPhones and make a little profit. On Tuesday, a group of seven unidentified individuals robbed a busy store in Natick, Massachusetts and made away with 19 iPhones worth $13,000 (roughly Rs. 8,69,000), according to a report.

The The MetroWest Daily reports that the group was caught on the store’s security camera. The footage shows seven individuals in hoodies, believed to be in their teens, entering the mall and making their way to the Apple Store. After gathering around the display tables where the iPhones are placed, the group managed to grab 19 iPhones before scrambling out. The whole incident was over in less than a minute, which suggests that the robbery was well planned out.

The Natick police are investigating the incident and believe the group might be connected to a similar event which occurred a few weeks ago in Hingham. In fact, there have been a string of such iPhone-related incidents over the past few weeks. Earlier in 2016, a total of 59 iPhones were stolen from New York Apple Stores by individuals disguised as employees. In September, two people were arrested for robbing a truck carrying over 1,000 iPhone 5s mobile phones worth Rs. 2.25 crores in Delhi, India.

Apple recently decided to remove tethers from its iPhones in various stores across the US. The company wanted the display units to feel more personal for potential buyers, and getting rid of the attached cable was one way of doing that. Invisible alarms are enabled on all these devices to prevent theft. The iPhones displayed at the Natick store, however, were tethered and the group cut the security cords for each before exiting the store.

 

Appleā€™s iPhone 7 A10 Processors Could Be Made By TSMC Only

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The Apple A9 processor in the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus is made by Samsung and TSMC and now according to a recent report, TSMC could score a deal with Apple to build all of the new A10 chips for the iPhone 7.

Since the release of the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus, we have seen a couple of videos showing a difference in performance between the two different A9 processors on the new handsets.

Apple even released a statement saying that there is no real difference in performance with regards to battery life on the two processors in their new smartphones.

The performance difference between the two different A9 processors produced by Samsung and TSMC is apparently the reason that Apple has chosen to go exclusively with TSMC for the new A10 processor in next years iPhone 7 and 7 Plus smartphones.

Whether TSMC will be able to produce enough chips for Apple to keep up with demand for next years iPhones remains to be seen, this is the reason that Apple uses two suppliers for the processors for the current models.

Apple Ordered to Pay $234 Million to University for Infringing Patent

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A US jury on Friday ordered Apple Inc to pay the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s patent licensing arm more than $234 million in damages for incorporating its microchip technology into some of the company’s iPhones and iPads without permission.

The amount was less than the $400 million the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) was claiming in damages after the jury on Tuesday said Apple infringed its patent for improving the performance of computer processors.

Apple said it would appeal the verdict, but declined to comment further.

WARF praised the verdict and said it was important to protect the university’s inventions from unauthorised use. “This decision is great news,” said WARF Managing Director Carl Gulbrandsen in a statement.

Jurors deliberated for about 3-1/2 hours before returning the verdict in the closely watched case in federal court in Madison, Wisconsin. It was the second phase of a trial that began on Oct. 5.

The jury was considering whether Apple’s A7, A8 and A8X processors, found in the iPhone 5s, 6 and 6 Plus, as well as several versions of the iPad, violated the patent.

WARF sued Apple in January 2014 alleging infringement of its 1998 patent on a “predictor circuit,” developed by computer science professor Gurindar Sohi and three of his students.

Much of the dispute over damages had to do with whether a certain portion of Apple’s chips that were placed in devices sold abroad, rather than in the United States, also violated the WARF patent. The jurors found that they did.

Apple had sought to greatly limit its liability, arguing before jurors that WARF deserved less than even the $110 million the foundation settled with Intel Corp after suing that company in 2008 over the same patent.

Apple had argued that WARF’s patent entitled it to as little as 7 cents per device sold, a far cry from the $2.74 that WARF was claiming.

WARF uses some of the income it generates to support research at the school, doling out more than $58 million in grants last year, according to its website.

On Thursday, US District Judge William Conley, who is presiding over the case, ruled that Apple had not willfully infringed WARF’s patent, eliminating a chance to triple the damages in the case.

Last month, WARF launched a second lawsuit against Apple, targeting the company’s newest chips and devices, the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus, and iPad Pro.